Avoiding the traps on Endangered Species Act reform

Last month, Deputy Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt announced that the department was planning significant changes in how it would administer the Endangered Species Act (ESA). The goal, he said, was to encourage “collaborative conservation” and “flexibility to incorporate innovation.” As he wrote in The Washington Post: It may surprise most Americans… that the highest level of protection is often applied, regardless of the classification, through application of a ‘blanket rule.’ The use of this rule by the U.S...

Endangered species and “cooperative conservation”

(Photo Credit: Zefram, Wiki User) Controversy over an April 4, 2016 decision of the U.S. District Court for the District of Montana ordering the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to reconsider whether to list the American wolverine as a threatened species illustrates the difficulty the Service often faces in protecting wildlife while maintaining relationships with State and local governments and important landowners...

Down to the River

On April 20, the federal Bureau of Reclamation announced terms for how water will be released in the coming months from California’s Shasta Dam. This dam is the largest reservoir in the state’s Central Valley and irrigates a major portion of central California’s farmland...

Fixing the Endangered Species Act

usfws Senior Advisor Scott Cameron just posted an interesting analysis of the broad impact of the federal Endangered Species Act.  An excerpt: The ESA is without a doubt the most powerful federal environmental statute.  I know from personal experience as a former U.S...